Zines

Zine Collection

Linebaugh Public Library has a Zine collection -- the first of its kind in Tennessee. The Zine collection is located on the Second Floor of the Linebaugh Public Library branch. You can find the zines next to our graphic novel collection.


Pictured are (from top, left): Uprise Zine, Fifth Estate, Zine World, Ross Winn, DIY Veg 1.0, Southern Fried, 11 o'clock, Nashville Femme, Wheelchair Dancer, RR, Frothy, Rattletrap, and Fertile Ground. Our collection also includes zines from the Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp.

Zine Collection FAQ
Q: What is a zine?
A: A zine (pronounced “zeen,” like “magazine”) is a self-published, small circulation, non-commercial booklet or magazine, usually produced by one person or a few individuals. Zines range from small photocopied booklets, to handwritten or handmade booklets, to magazine-like publications, although they come in all shapes, sizes, topics, and formats. They can include personal essays, political discussions, fiction, craft or do-it-yourself advice, articles about music or movies, comics, reviews – anything under the sun, really. Zines are a rich and democratic form of self-expression and often represent points of view missed by mainstream media.

Q: How can I find Linebaugh's zines?
A: The zines are shelved roughly alphabetically by title in a special section near the Graphic Novels at Linebaugh Public Library. Available zines can be found in our online catalog. Simply type "zines" in the search box as a keyword search. You can also search by title or author. We also have several zine-related books, which are shelved with other books according to their call number or are shelved with the zine collection.

Q: Can I check them out?
A: Yes. Zines check out for 2 weeks and can be renewed, just like books. Overdue fees will be 10 cents per day. You can only check out 20 zines at a time.

Q: Can I check them out / return them to other branches?
A: Yes. Just like our books, DVDs, and other items, you can request for zines to be sent to any LPLS branch by placing them on hold. You can also return them to any LPLS branch.

Q: Do you accept zine donations?
A: Yes. Please email zines@linebaugh.org for more information. We will review all donations before adding them to the collection. Any zines we cannot use will be donated to another zine library or organization.

Q: Can I suggest a zine for the library to buy?
A: Yes, we would love to hear your suggestions. Please email zines@linebaugh.org.

Q: Why did Linebaugh Public Library start a zine collection?
A: Zines are a format generally underrepresented within public libraries. Zines are appealing to many library users (or potential users) who are in their teens, 20s, or 30s. There currently is nowhere else in Middle Tennessee a person can go to find or read a sizeable collection of zines. The subjects covered in zines include a variety of topics that may be currently limited within our library collection, allowing us to expand the breadth of our resources, providing a greater diversity of ideas and materials. Additionally, developing a zine collection demonstrates the library’s support for independent media within our community, while also illustrating our commitment to recognizing the interests of youth in our community and their potential for contribution. A zine collection at Linebaugh Library fits within the broader goals stated within the LPLS Collection Development Policy. Although our collection is starting small, we will be adding zines on an ongoing basis.

Q: Do other libraries have zines?
Yes! There are zine collections at several public and academic libraries, including San Francisco Public LibrarySalt Lake City Public Libraries, the Seattle Public LibraryMultnomah County Library (in Oregon), Barnard College LibraryUniversity of Kentucky (in Lexington), and Bowling Green State University’s Popular Culture Library. A complete list of zine libraries can be found at the Zine World website.

Q: Where can I find more information about zines?
A: Here are a few resources you can use to find more information about zines:
• Online resources include:
◦ ZineBook has how-to articles, a history of zines, and other information
◦ ZineWiki, an online encyclopedia devoted to zine history and culture
• Popular review zines include:
◦ Zine World: A Reader’s Guide to the Underground Press – website includes upcoming zine event listings, a how-to guide, and links to other online resources
◦ Xerography Debt – website includes PDFs of each issue
◦ Broken Pencil, a Canadian review zine
• Popular zine distros include:
◦ Microcosm Publishing
◦ Parcell Press

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